Silicon Photonics


AM (3D printing) and related technologies for Si photonics packaging

Supervisor: Prof G T Reed
Co-supervisor: Prof W Stewart

The recently-started Southampton-based major Silicon Photonics for Future systems EPSRC project (G Reed PI, W Stewart co-I) is aimed at making Si integrated photonics devices that have a major effect in practical systems. It includes packaging and connection to optical fibres as a key objective. WS is also on the advisory board for the Nottingham-based EPSRC additive manufacturing (3D printing) centre, which is exploring new and innovative techniques and we have been discussing options for exploiting these and other ideas for the SPFS project objectives. Examples are the use of heavily-Si-nanoparticle-loaded fluids (commercially available we have some) as high refractive index liquids to aid coupling and the AM printing of tapers between fibres and Si chips in various devices. We anticipate that other concepts that do not necessarily involve 3D printing would also be explored, linked to existing work on the SPFS project.

Work would be largely based at Southampton but periods at Nottingham would also be involved.

 

Mid-infrared nonlinear photonics in group IV semiconductor waveguides

Supervisor: Prof Anna Peacock
Co-supervisor: Dr Goran Mashanovich

Recently there has been tremendous interest in migrating group IV (silicon and germanium) photonics beyond telecoms and into the mid-infrared. Much of the motivation for this move stems from the potential to develop devices for use in important application areas such as environmental sensing, homeland security, and medicine. However, there are a number of other compelling reasons to move to this wavelength regime where the semiconductor materials offer extended low loss transmission windows (1-6um for silicon and 2-14um for germanium). Specifically for nonlinear applications, silicon and germanium exhibit strong nonlinear coefficients and reduced nonlinear absorption in this region, so that the device efficiency can be greatly increased.

This project will start with the nonlinear characterization of mid-infrared waveguides fabricated from various silicon and germanium platforms to establish a set of design criteria for device construction. The optimized waveguides will then be used to demonstrate nonlinear frequency conversion through Raman amplification, four-wave mixing, and supercontinuum generation for application in spectroscopy and sensing.

 

Mid-infrared nonlinear photonics in group IV
semiconductor waveguides 

Supervisors: Dr Anna Peacock
Co-supervisor: Dr Goran Mashanovich

Recently there has been tremendous interest in migrating group IV (silicon and germanium) photonics beyond telecoms and into the mid-infrared. Much of the motivation for this move stems from the potential to develop devices for use in important application areas such as environmental sensing, homeland security, and medicine.
However, there are a number of other compelling reasons to move to this wavelength regime where the semiconductor materials offer extended low loss transmission windows (1-6um for silicon and 2-14um for germanium). Specifically for nonlinear applications, silicon and germanium exhibit strong nonlinear coefficients and reduced nonlinear absorption in this region, so that the device efficiency can be greatly increased.
This project will start with the nonlinear characterisation of mid-infrared waveguides fabricated from various silicon and germanium platforms to establish a set of design criteria for device construction. The optimised waveguides will then be used to demonstrate nonlinear frequency conversion through Raman amplification, four-wave mixing, and supercontinuum generation for application in spectroscopy and sensing.

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