Optical Microfibre Devices and Sensors

In the last decade Nanotechnology has increasingly attracted researchers' attention and funding from all over the world. 

Because of their unique physical and optical properties and their easy interconnection to fiberised components, optical fibre nanowires provide an exclusive way to connect the optical fibre world with nanotechnology.

The OMDS group studies the properties of nano-/micro-wires and their exploitation in devices and sensors, which can find applications in biology, medicine, optics, sub-wavelength imaging, high power fibre lasers, industrial safety and security.

Group webpage

PhD Projects:

Fabrication of passive and active UV transparent fibres

Supervisor: Dr Gilberto Brambilla
Co-Supervisor: Jayanta Sahu, David Richardson, Shaif-ul Alam

Optical fibre lasers offer significant benefits in comparison to other laser sources, such as extremely low thermal lensing, extraordinarily good beam quality and a very high wall-plug efficiency. The increasing deployment of high power fibre lasers in manufacturing can substantially improve energy consumption and system reliability. To date high power fibre lasers have only been manufactured in the near-IR exploiting the excellent spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in a silica glass matrix. The challenge has now moved on and is to extend the wavelength coverage accessible from fibre systems to the mid- and far-ultraviolet (UV). This will be pursued by a new fibre laser system using UV transparent fibres doped with rare earths and a two-photon pump scheme with a visible/near-IR laser.

This project directly addresses this challenge, and spans from the manufacture of specialty silica fibres transparent in the UV to fibres doped with novel lasing elements, to the design of fiberized laser pumps, to their combination in suitable systems to produce a new generation of affordable high performance lasers operating in the UV.

This project will involve collaborations with the high power fibre laser group and the fibre fabrication group.

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