Photonic, Electronic and Plasmonic Microstructured Optical Fibres

Advanced technological applications demand high performance devices, which in turn require exceptional materials. Focussing on the fundamental materials research and development necessary to move this innovation beyond the laboratory to next-generation photonic devices and systems the group have already developed and patented an innovative technique towards purely fibre based systems. 

A fibre based system is preferable as it avoids the use of heterogeneous, discrete optoelectronic components to transform in-fibre photonic signals to chip-based electronic signals which is complex and high in cost. 

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PhD Projects:

Photonic fibres for solar fuels generation

Supervisor: Dr Pier Sazio 
Co-supervisors: Marco Petrovich, Jacob Mackenzie (ORC),
Robert Raja (FNES/Chemistry), Lindsay Armstrong (FEE)

The key to unlocking the vast potential of renewable energy, in which thousands of TW of solar power are available, is the development of robust, highly scalable, cost effective and efficient methods of storage. Ideally this energy vector should be in the form of “drop-in” hydrocarbon fuels that integrate seamlessly into the existing global multi trillion dollar petrochemical infrastructure.

Our newly funded EPSRC project brings together researchers from the ORC, Chemistry and Engineering and the Environment to develop a state of the art technology for the conversion of CO2 into synthetic, renewable fuels.

Alongside this, computational models and simulations will provide physical insight to evaluate and optimise the photonic fibre catalytic converter technology. This will subsequently support the development of a lab-scale reactor which will demonstrate the scalability of this state-of-the-art renewable energy technology.

This ambitious project would thus be suitable for a bright, motivated candidate with strong interest in optical materials, chemistry, engineering and the environment. The project will lead to highly transferable skills in green technology, advanced numerical modelling and device characterisation whilst interacting with a wide range of experts leading in the field. 


 

Microstructured optical fibres with embedded electrodes for novel electro-optic devices

Supervisor: Pier Sazio

Optical fibres with embedded electrodes are widely utilized in a number of scientific and technological applications. In combination with the highly innovative semiconductor deposition technology we have developed here at the ORC in collaboration with colleagues in the US, the project will span the multidisciplinary remit of cleanroom based, fibre materials development, the fabrication of radically new photonic devices that utilise high electric fields applied within microstructured fibre waveguides. This could result in novel gain media as well as exotic nonlinear photonic devices.

Furthermore, there is tremendous scope to expand these ideas and thus create a radically new “optoelectronic” technology that encompasses gas laser technology, electrically pumped optical fibres and many other technological innovations.

This ambitious project would thus be suitable for a bright, motivated candidate with a strong physics/materials/engineering related background to develop highly transferable skills in materials growth, advanced numerical modelling and fibre device characterisation whilst interacting with a wide range of experts leading in the field.

 

Microstructured optical fibres as templates for functional material deposition

Supervisor: Pier Sazio

This project seeks to advance our exciting materials developments developed here at the ORC and in collaboration with colleagues at Penn State and will span the multidisciplinary remit between cleanroom based, fibre impregnation technology for the manufacture of highly advanced photonic devices for analysis in our fully equipped characterization laboratories.

The aim will be to develop in-fibre deposition technology from the silicon materials we routinely manufacture, though to other semiconductor materials such as ZnSe and their and alloys, plus other classes of materials such as oxides, nitrides, metals and novel chalcogenide monolayer materials.

This ambitious project would thus be suitable for a bright, motivated candidate with a strong materials and/or chemistry related background to develop highly transferable skills in materials growth and fibre device characterisation whilst interacting with a wide range of experts leading in the field. 


 

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